Remembering Marvel legend Stan Lee

Reprinted+from+The+New+York+Times
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Back to Article

Remembering Marvel legend Stan Lee

Reprinted from The New York Times

Reprinted from The New York Times

Reprinted from The New York Times

Reprinted from The New York Times

Chris Keuchguerian & Nicole Felici, Staff Writer & Copy Editor

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Stanley Martin Lieber, nicknamed “Stan Lee,” was born in Manhattan, New York, December 29, 1922. Lee was pushed to enter the workforce from a young age, and his parents did so by having him skip grades throughout school. He later attended DeWitt Clinton High School (an all boys high school), where Lee excelled academically, but struggled to make friends due to his young age.

During high school, Lee explored many possible careers, but a field that really caught his eye was comics and entertainment. His passion for entertainment grew so large that he began to work at a theatre and eventually at the Rivoli as an usher. This job gave Lee the freedom to not only see all the movies he wanted but also to bring money home to his struggling family. Later in his high school life, Lee worked as an assistant at the company, Timely Comics. In this position, his bosses saw Lee’s talents, and he eventually began to write most of the issues. Later on, the owners of Timely Comics, Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, left the company. This left an open spot for Stan Lee to become editor in chief and art director for all of Timely’s publications.

In World War II, Lee entered the U.S. Army in 1942 and primarily wrote manuals, scripts for training films and was commissioned to make a poster to encourage soldiers to have safe sex to combat the syphilis outbreak in Europe.
Lee is best known for creating Marvel superheroes, like Spider-Man, the Incredible Hulk, the X-men, Thor, Doctor Strange, the Fantastic Four, Iron Man and more. He created these characters with the help of Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko.

Stan Lee had many successes with Marvel. After making Spider-Man, Lee’s comic book sales skyrocketed, passing one of their major rivals, DC Comics. Later in 1966, his cartoon, Marvel Superheroes, premiered despite having a low animating budget. When Lee became publisher of Marvel in 1972, he pushed forward the idea of the Incredible Hulk having a four-season television series starring Lou Ferrigno.

Today, Stan Lee’s legacy is seen in countless comics, iconic movie cameos, television shows and merchandise. Many actors owe their successful careers to Lee’s ingenious world of Marvel. He passed away at the age of 95 on November 12, 2018 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He is survived by his daughter, Joan, and his countless fans across the world. While Lee may be gone, his legacy will never die.

1922-2018. Excelsior!