World War II bombings remain in atmosphere

Bombs+Away%3A+A+plane+flies+over+Germany+during+WWII+and+drops+a+bomb%2C+which+will+eventually+have+lasting+impacts+in+the+ionosphere.
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World War II bombings remain in atmosphere

Bombs Away: A plane flies over Germany during WWII and drops a bomb, which will eventually have lasting impacts in the ionosphere.

Bombs Away: A plane flies over Germany during WWII and drops a bomb, which will eventually have lasting impacts in the ionosphere.

Phys.org

Bombs Away: A plane flies over Germany during WWII and drops a bomb, which will eventually have lasting impacts in the ionosphere.

Phys.org

Phys.org

Bombs Away: A plane flies over Germany during WWII and drops a bomb, which will eventually have lasting impacts in the ionosphere.

Shayna Tilles, Centerspread Editor

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The bombing raids during World War II devastated the globe and has recently been a topic in the news. According to the scientific journal Annales Geophysicae, the Earth’s ionosphere has been affected by the bombings, especially where Allied air raids took place over Germany.  A study on the ionosphere suggests that there is a reduced amount of negatively charged electrons due to each bombing raid having the power of several hundred lightning strikes. The aftermath of the bombing could last up to a day’s time and travel up to 600 miles away from the strike-zone.

Researchers at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom analyzed data on 152 bombing raids between 1943-1945 and compared the data to atmospheric measurements. It was discovered that the ionosphere was impacted more when bombs between 100-800 tons (For better understanding, one ton of explosives has the same amount of energy lightning strike). The bombs would be released and a change in the ionosphere would occur a few hours later.   

Scientists have been using the word “wobble” to show what has happened in the ionosphere, which seems to be the most accurate term to describe the changes. The National Weather Service’s Space Weather Prediction Center or SWPC has been using new technology to help solve technological problems that use satellites. For example, a solar storm in October 2003 caused the ionosphere to have extensive effects, which even forced aircraft to reroute due to GPS errors.  These “wobbles” in the atmosphere has the potential to help us have a better understanding of technology that we use daily, like a radio and GPS systems.

 

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World War II bombings remain in atmosphere